My sister has down syndrome, how can I talk to her about periods?

have a sister with downsyndrome who’s 10 years old. She’s starting to develop and the subject of periods has come up. There’s not much advice online about this so my question is what would the best route to go down be trying to deal with periods while she’s in school. We have tried to have the talk but she doesn’t understand fully and she will be scared and not be able to manage it on her own. How do we deal with periods in a special needs child who doesn’t understand? x

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Help a mama out and respond anonymously on our forum. My sister has downsyndrome, how can I talk to her about periods?

My suggestion would be find a teacher or aid that she trusts and is fully comfortable with that you can talk to so she has some help if it happens at school

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I’d suggest maybe trying to find a Down syndrome support group on fb and seeing if other parents have a suggestion or how they did it

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When I worked at a school for special needs kids we just explained its part of their hygiene and showed the girls how to put a pad on and how to wrap it up. Explained the importance of washing their hands when they were done using the bathroom and discussed how it’s one of those bodily functions we don’t discuss with other people. Just explain it in terms she will understand and won’t be scary for her and reassure her it’s a normal woman thing.

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Use social stories! Here is a link with a list of social stories about puberty. Anytime you can pair with visuals, it’s super helpful!

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I would talk to a Dr about getting her on birth control to stop her periods. It would be the best for her so she doesn’t get scared.

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Just be honest and explain everything properly.

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Is it an option to get her on a long term BC that can stop her periods? Is she logically/physically capable of using tampons/pads? If she’d constantly need help every month the best option to avoid a blood biohazard situation might be to get her on something to stop them. :thinking:

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For the people saying birth control. She’s 10!

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The lady I cared for parents sterilized her. So she never had one

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I highly recommend finding her some period panties! They have flow ratings. The best ones have coverage from front waistband to back waistband. Maybe she won’t actually start for a few more years & she may understand then.

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Follow this lady on TikTok. Her sister lives with her and has Down syndrome. She is always willing to educate and give advice plus their page is super cute!

https://www.tiktok.com/t/ZTdKPQhYg/

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I know this seems silly but… Look on YouTube & tiktok. I found a few videos of moms journeys… might be helpful to see what worked for them, good luck!

I think that showing her videos will help her to understand and learn better than explanations.Go with her to the bathroom and show her how to do it ( change and wrap ) and practice with her until she get it .
If she attend a special school or is in a special group she should be able to miss some days without any big issues.
Talk to her teachers / assistant about it so they can help her .

My daughter is disabled and thanks God she had an amazing teacher who I texted constantly when she had her periods , he had an assistant in the classroom and she made sure that she changed her pads contanstly to prevent accidents, I always sent a change of clothes, extra pads and wipes in a little bag

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Are there any elders around that have down syndrome that might be able to help? Sometimes someone that thinks like you can explain it better. Even a teen that has down syndrome that’s willing to help would be cool.

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Use videos and examples …show her how to put on a pad…maybe put some juice on ur underwear and show her that when this happens it’s okay then show her how to use a pad…and then let her do it herself so she knows how

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When my daughter was younger she missed tons of social cues and was basically in La-la land for lack of better terms. I was worried about how she’d react so starting early on I always allowed her to barge in the bathroom and see me take care of things and if she asked I’d tell her why and what was going on. I’m so glad I did this so she could see first hand and be ready when her time came… she didn’t freak out at all! She was as calm as anybody could be. Give her demonstrations. Put a pair of panties on around your ankles over your pants or whatever and explain that soon she will experience this new thing that all girls do and you are going to show her how to handle it. Then explain disposal and changing often and washing hands, etc

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Period panties are what I would try. I teach sped and that’s just something I dealt with. I considered part of my job. Make sure that you communicate with parents and keep track so you can give a heads up it’s that time.

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Alot of women are actually using always “diapers” and thinx panties! I think it’s a great idea and just explain it when it happens and answer any questions

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Have you talked to her pediatrician about your concerns? They can advise and assist.

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Period panties :+1:t2: the over night absorbancy last a school length day

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Period undies 100% she won’t have to change at school at all

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Have you joined any of the Down Syndrome groups on facebook and asked on there? My daughter has DS, but she’s only 2, so we have a long time before thinking about that. I’d say one of those groups would be the best place to ask this question… I know I’ve seen some common questions concerning this recently in at least 1 of the groups I’m in. Sorry I can’t be more help…

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Some are quite frightened, while some take it in their stride…like the rest of us…no one really likes it but it is a natural event.
There are good books with clear illustrations…talking frankly at her level and using pictures to show her…above all ensure she knows it is a very normal thing to happen for girls…and that it is a private thing to share with Mum’s, Caregivers and female siblings not everyone you come across… Sometimes such exciting bodily functions become school playground talk!

I had a down syndrome sister, and she was fine with the whole process. She knew when to change her pads and take care of herself during her time of the month. Down syndrome people are not incapable of learning. We were Blessed to have my Baby sister for 57 years before she passed away from dementia…

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Look online! There are tons of books and videos that explain it perfectly. With her being 10 I’d maybe even try a childrens book. Amazon has tons of books, just search: menstruation books for girls. Books are always my go to with my kiddos when it comes to conversations about our bodies. When my boys have a question about their bodies we read a kids book and I answer any of their questions throughout the story. They’ve learned about hygiene, why their body does the things it does, breastfeeding, anatomically correct terms for their body parts, and tons more all from little $5-$10 books on Amazon. You can also download the kindle app and there may be free or very cheap books on there since it is a digital version of the book.

I have a special needs daughter, will be turning 5 Monday. She will never grasp having a period. We’ll be using period panties. I don’t have any advice on how to hold a conversation with sis but I pray when you do she’ll understand to at least come to you or get ahold of someone at school(teacher) that can help(get ahold of parents/guardian). :black_heart:

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I worked in a Group home for 33 years. Most of the ladies were put o. Birth control that stopped the periods.

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Jill Robinson Paula Kesterson

Prepare her a little pack in her school bag with pads, wipes, fresh undies etc. Give her as much support and advice as you can. Also, her teachers or carers will have plenty of experience too so she’s going to be absolutely fine once she gets used to it.

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I’m guessing she’s not in main stream school due to downs syndrome. I’m sure the school deals with this considering the children they have in their care. Definitely call and explain to the school so they can make sure she’s looked after in there. At home just teach her she has to change it everytime it becomes full or every hour or two. She will get used to it :heart:

I worked with a lady who had a down syndrome daughter, she was so afraid the girl would be taken advantage of and get pregnant. She and her husband decided to have her a hysterectomy per doctor’s advice. She did great through it all. I guess it would be up to parents, doctors. She was a beautiful girl, this was in the 1960’s.

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Following… Amber Melancon

So my sister still doesn’t fully understand 15 years later. She knows it’s her period and will tell someone when it starts but doesn’t know why she gets it. She has to wear depends and a thick pad when she’s on her period. Over time she’s learned how to use them but when she was younger we had to do it for her. Luckily she had a great TA that took charge of it in school and always made sure she stayed clean in school. It really depends on your sister. Some kids understand more than others, you know her level of understanding and have to go by that. All my sister will ever understand is that she is bleeding and it’s called her period.

I’ve heard good things about “The Care and Keeping of You” books. Might help.

l get paid over $177 per hour working from home. l never thought I’d be able to do it but my buddy makes over $18985 a month doing this and she convinced me to try. The possibility with this is endless.

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Down syndrome support groups may have some great information.
Also might be worth a discussion with dr
No need to change school
Modi bodi or similar underwear are good too

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When I worked with downs people
They were prescribed the pill with no brake
Some of them had trouble handling the hygiene side of Periods
Speak to her dr about it his method

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There are a variety of paperback books you can buy to help talk to her about them. Look on Amazon, or Barnes and Noble. Any large book store will have them. Some use simpler English for younger children or developmentally delayed. Are you her guardian? Talk to her pediatrician. Depo shots or an implant might be a smart idea so she doesn’t have any menstruation to start with.

I work with adults with disabilities, which includes those with down syndrome and autism. Depending on her level of comprehension, she may never understand and will just need assistance or she may be able to handle things herself. Maybe just find a children’s book about periods, but she may not truly understand until she actually has one for the first time.

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My niece is 16 and has Down Syndrome. She was put on the Depo shot several years ago to stop her periods.

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As someone before me said still try to talk to her about it and use period panties. That way she won’t have to worry about dealing with the pads and having to change them while at school.

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I have a 17 yo daughter with Down Syndrome. I have her on the DEPO shot. Only because mentally she is like 6 or 7 and she wouldn’t tell me when she would start due to being scared and she was irregular so i never knew when it was coming. She has been on Depo shot for the past 3 years. It’s hard. Good luck

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I think a lot of people and the people who take care of people who have intellectual disabilities are normally put on birth control of some sort so nobody has to worry about periods.

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Autism mom here! Best advice I ever got for my daughter about period. Take her in the bathroom with you when you have yours explain clean up, pads how to dispose most of these kids are visual learners so just show them quick trip in the bathroom wont hurt

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Google social stories for periods

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YouTube has some good explanation videos and books also

I’d sit her down and start the conversation with pee and poop… and then explain that there soon will be a new addition. And buy her supplies and period panties

There are a few good books out there x

Debbie Martin-Starnes

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You could consider some type of birth control where she won’t have periods.

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They have children books that teach in a very simple way how our body’s work and why. I would go to the local library and have a conversation with the librarian. Or check out Amazon.

Who Has What?: All About Girls’ Bodies and Boys’ Bodies (Let’s Talk about You and Me) Amazon.com

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My son started asking questions about the difference between biyd and girls which is normal for his age. It’s important to have healthy and honest discussions about our body’s and the safety of our bodies

Body Safety Book for Kids: A… https://www.amazon.com/dp/1991164041?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

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I was talking to a mom, and the conversation was brought up about a menstrual. Because my friend has three special needs children and one of her kids is autistic and she had me ask someone what do they do whenever their daughter goes through it. I happened to meet that woman and that conversation was brought up and she said that her daughter is 12 and she uses period panties and that is the best thing that has helped. Her daughter is severely autistic.

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How effected is she by the downs syndrome? What is the severity? There are several different ways it could be done but it would really depend on what her degree of understanding is. If she is considered vulnerable, then there is always the option of speaking with a doctor to see if the periods could be stopped. Either for her safety and/or if it is distressing her

Special needs mom here. My daughter just started hers. All I did was talk to her about it and then showed her what to do while explaining it again. I did that a couple times while we figured out the best pads to use for her so that she would have the least amount of issues when on her own. She should also have a aid in school to help her. My child does. Mine is also physically disabled as well as mentally delayed. But mind you they are far more intelligent than we give them credit for. I think she will amaze you and have a better understanding once she starts having to actually deal with it. They’re just kids who need a bit more guidance than your typical kid sometimes.

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Go on YouTube (I know it sounds strange lol) but there are a couple families on there whom have kids with Down syndrome, whom share their daily lives with special needs kids…autism, Down syndrome, etc. a couple of them have posted videos specifically on this subject and gave advice on how they handled it. Might be a good place to start.

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Please join this group. This question comes up often but I have a son with DS so I don’t read the advice. Thank you for reaching out and asking for help.

l get paid over $177 per hour working from home. l never thought I’d be able to do it but my buddy makes over $18953 a month doing this and she convinced me to try. The possibility with this is endless.

M0re Info. https://amazingearning916.pages.dev/

Teach her when she has it

I bought this for my daughter who just started a few weeks ago.

HelloFlo: The Guide, Period.: The Everything Puberty Book for the Modern Girl https://a.co/4XAlFFO

It’s got a lot of information, but with pictures, & it doesn’t shy away from talking about everything that comes with starting your period.
Obviously my situation is different from yours, but perhaps going through the book, or a book together may help? I’m sure people with special need kid’s may have some more in-tuned advice, but I hope the book helps, & I wish you luck. :black_heart:

If she has started her period time find gynecologist and they can help too explain her

There is a support group on Facebook for down syndrome loved ones and they give great advice.

Get her the always pull ups they will last her all day

Well, I can’t imagine it would be easy. My daughter is Autistic and it’s hard for me to talk to her about that time of the month so what I do, is I show her when I’m on the rag what I use, how to clean yourself, what to do to not feel yucky, ect… sometimes visual and explaining is better then just trying to explain.

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I got my daughter period panties to wear. I got them on Amazon. As to explain, I think the best thing is to show how it’s done when she starts.

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Period panties by knix or ruby red, tgey have built in liners and are machine washable

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Not much to talk about.wIt until it happens.teach her to change a pad everytime she uses the bathroom and to wash her hands answer her question if she has any dont over complicate.

I am assuming she has an IEP for school, if you are in the states, if she does, Mom may need to ask for a meeting to have an aide added for her.

My daughter was 9 when she started her period and so was I…there are so many things you can do…if you need help please PM me…more than happy to help.:heart::sunflower:

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I worked with students with special needs for 30 years. Most of mine were on the Depo shot. Warning it makes some GAIN weight, break through bleed or not bleed at all. There are books out there Amazon them. Let her j ow it happens to all girls growing up even you , teach her how to use and dispose of pads. I bet she will do better than you think. Good luck😊

I have a special needs child… her teachers were very helpful! They will go with her into the bathroom and instruct her on how to change her pad… etc… just send an extra set of panties and bottoms with some pads to keep in her locker at all times! My daughter has. Rare chromosome disorder… 9P Trisomy… she will not wear a pad no matter what I do… so I buy her those period panties… they are wonderful… when she starts bleeding… she will tell me… and I just instructed her to put on her black panties… which she usually already does on her own! Those panties are well worth the cost!! We have about 16 pair!! I was the mother that stressed over this… and it ended up being no big deal!! Trust me… the teachers will help her!! Just talk to them!! My daughter was 14 before she started… so I was thankful for that!!

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